Trenton Thunder Reveal 2011 Roster

11 04 2011
Manny Banuelos

Expect young prospect Manny Banuelos to hone his craft with the Thunder this season.

Earlier this week, the Trenton Thunder released their final roster. Below is the complete list, followed by my reactions and thoughts as the Eastern League season gets underway:

PITCHERS: Cory Arbiso, Wilkins Arias, Manny Banuelos^, Dellin Betances*, Jeremy Bleich**, Grant Duff**, Steve Garrison*, Shaeffer Hall, Fernando Hernandez, Craig Heyer, Alan Horne**, Kei Igawa, Tim Norton, Naoya Okamoto, Graham Stoneburner, Pat Venditte

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Q&A: Josh Norris, The Trentonian

3 04 2011

I spoke with Josh Norris, who covers the Trenton Thunder (the New York Yankees’ AA-affiliate team) for the Trentonian. Below are some excerpts from our chat:

Making the Majors: On average, how long does the average minor league career last?

Josh Norris: It really depends on a lot of things—where you’re drafted, or if you’re a high school player versus a college player. Obviously, if a team drafts you with a higher pick, they’re going to push you through the minors quicker. But if you’re a high school player, they’re going to compensate sometimes for your lack of seasoning in high school.

Take a kid like Adam Warren. He was drafted in the fourth round in the 2009 draft, from the University of North Carolina. Last year was his second professional season, and he went from High-A Tampa to Trenton. This year he’ll probably start in Triple-A Scranton. So in just about two professional seasons, he’s almost in the major leagues.

Then there’s Slade Heathcott, who was drafted in the first round in 2009.  He was a little more raw because he was coming straight out of high school. He doesn’t know what professional life is like, so it takes a little longer for him to get adapted to things like long bus rides and managing money, aside from developing his skills as a player. They’re taking things a little slower with him because of the fact that he’s younger. There’s always the exception to every rule, but for the most part that’s how it goes.

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